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September 15, 2020

What to Know About Telehealth Technology & COVID-19

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Stuff has a way of accumulating, doesn’t it, in just about every room in your home?

No matter how hard you try, there is that drawer that always seems full of junk, that closet that has defied organization. The medicine cabinet? Forget about it! GettyImages-1133699604

Fortunately, Parade.com offers general decluttering tips that can work in every room of the house, starting with keeping all flat surfaces clear. That, all by itself, can give your home a more clutter-free appearance. Throw what needs discarded into a recycling bin or in trash bags, and store what you can in drawers and cupboards — and hang what can be hung on hooks. Decide what storage solutions will work best, using areas that are under-utilized, such as putting seasonal clothes in soft garment bags under a bed.

No two people will successfully declutter in exactly the same way, and it’s important to choose a style that fits your life. For you, this could involve focusing one on room in your home per week while, for someone else, prioritizing closets throughout the house may work better. Maybe the idea of going clutter free in 30 days appeals to you — or maybe that adds pressure to the process and leads to procrastination. When it comes to decluttering, be you! Do what works.

RealSimple.com also offers professional tips to declutter your home. And, if your ultimate goal is to declutter every room in the house, this site suggests that it may make sense to start in the entryway. Because this is the first place that visitors will see, it’s a good place to “corral the chaos” by giving everyone in the family a basket for their belongings. Then, strategically place these baskets in a way that looks attractive and clutter-free.

If you’re looking to declutter your kitchen, Good Housekeeping suggests you focus on your cabinets, expanding the storage spaces available. This could include adding a roll-out rack in a cupboard or mounting one on your pantry door. Don’t waste storage spaces with pots and pans. Instead, hang them from a suspended pot rack.

Ready to declutter your living room? If so, then avoid the temptation of filling up your coffee table with books, flower arrangements and more. Instead, keep it 75% clear to give it a clutter-free look. Coffee tables with drawers and shelves provide an extra storage solution so, if you’re shopping for a new one, keep that in mind.

You could also arrange candles and decorative knick-knacks on attractive trays — and, when guests are coming and you want a more clutter-free appearance in your living room, you can remove the tray and all its contents and put it away.

When Re-Clutter Happens

Right now, two generations are downsizing at the same time leading to 60- and 70-year-old people being given their parents’ belongings that they just don’t want.

So, right when you’re trying to declutter your home, you may suddenly become responsible for a whole lot more stuff.

If this happens, it makes sense to first decide what to keep, either because you can use it or because there are meaningful stories behind the belongings. If there are items of value you don’t want, you could see if other family members would appreciate having them. You can also see if a store or auction house might take some of the in-demand items to resell them.

Look at what’s remaining and then see what you can donate or sell at a bargain price to give those belongings a good home. What’s left can go in the recycling bin or trash bags.

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