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Kendal at Home Blog

Staying Healthy: World’s Healthiest Diets Feature Fresh Veggies

Posted by Lynne Giacobbe on November 27, 2012 at 5:10 PM

japanese stirfryAs a mature adult, you know how important it is to eat a balanced and healthy diet. What you put into your body can determine not only your weight, but your energy levels and strength of your immune system, as well. Now that your diet can so heavily affect how you feel on a day to day basis, it has never been more important to prepare and eat healthy meals. 

You know you should eat your fruits and veggies, but why are some world cuisines healthier than others? That’s the question Dr. Daphne Miller explores in her book, The Jungle Effect: The Healthiest Diets from Around the World—Why They Work and How to Make Them Work for You. While Dr. Miller ranked the Mediterranean diet as the most nutritious diet on the planet (see our previous post), a number of other cuisines also offer superior health and nutrition benefits for older adults. 

Today, we continue our rundown on the world’'s healthiest diets: 

  1. Named for its California start, California Fresh is defined by the simple preparation of fresh, locally-grown foods that make this diet naturally low in calories and rich in vital nutrients. Now embraced by chefs across the country, California Fresh emphasizes locally-sourced seasonal fruits and vegetables for maximum flavor and nutrition.
  2. Vietnamese cuisine features seafood and plenty of fresh vegetables. Its use of fresh antioxidant-rich herbs for seasoning and broth— instead of oil for cooking— distinguishes Vietnamese cooking as a low-calorie, healthy diet.
  3. The traditional Japanese diet, favored by the centenarians of Okinawa, is rich in cancer-fighting vegetables and fruits, omega-3-rich seafood, green tea, brown rice, and unprocessed soy. Healthy stir-fry and steam cooking preserve the foods’ nutrients. Many Okinawans also practice Hara Hachi Bu, the practice of only eating until they feel 80 percent full.
  4. Indian cuisine is flavored with aromatic spices that has cancer-fighting and anti-inflammatory properties. Two of the spices frequently used in Indian cuisine – turmeric and ginger – may also help fight Alzheimer’s disease, which is four times lower in India than in the U.S. 

Kendal at Oberlin chefs frequently include nutritious dishes from the world’'s healthiest cuisines on the daily menus at our restaurants. Kendal at Home participants can also enjoy these delicious meals, prepackaged for easy home consumption. For more information, contact us today

Photo: 46137

Topics: staying healthy, healthy diet, mature adult

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